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ICD-10 2018: This Is Why Documenting Site Matters for Undescended-Testicle Coding

15. August 2017

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Our initial overview of ICD-10-CM 2018 looked at specialties with a large number of changes. But there are plenty of important changes coming Oct. 1, 2017, that didn’t fit into that quick analysis. Case in point: Urology has some interesting new codes that will be important for anyone who reports services related to congenital undescended […]

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Add ICD-10-CM Accuracy to Your Repeat Pap Smear Claims

28. July 2017

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Right about now it feels like all eyes are on ICD-10-CM 2018 (and there are plenty of changes to deal with). But we’ve got to be sure codes for our current claims are accurate, too. Today let’s get back to basics with a look at how to handle diagnosis coding for repeat Pap smears. Zero […]

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Learn the ABCs (and Zs) of IUD Coding

30. June 2017

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Intrauterine devices (IUDs) for birth control are fairly common, but somehow the coding for IUD-related services isn’t as clear-cut as it could be. In today’s post, get to know the codes and a common coding hurdle to watch for. Go Through All the Code Sets to Find the Codes CPT® provides these codes for IUD […]

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Don’t Let EHR Tempt You to Upcode E/M Services

27. June 2017

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EHRs can assist with many aspects of E/M coding (like tracking for coding based on time), but the problem of reporting higher-level E/M codes without medical necessity is still around. A recent article in Ophthalmology Coding Alert discussed the example of a doctor who billed almost all level-four and level-five E/M codes for established patients. […]

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Get to Know Aftercare Z Codes: Official Guidelines and Examples

30. May 2017

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How many of the 15 pages on Z codes have you read in the ICD-10-CM Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting? More than a page is devoted to aftercare visit codes in Section I.C.21.c.7. Here’s a quick refresher on what you should know about aftercare coding, including the ICD-10 twist for injury codes. The Basic […]

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Are You an Anatomy Ace? This Chemo Quiz Will Tell

4. May 2017

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Let’s mix things up today with a little test. An article in Oncology & Hematology Coding Alert about intracavitary chemotherapy made me think about the importance of knowing anatomy when you need to pick an appropriate code. We often think about anatomy with ICD-10-CM codes, but it’s important for CPT® codes, too. That’s the inspiration […]

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Secrets to Subsequent Hospital E/M Coding Success

2. May 2017

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Curious how your use of subsequent hospital visit codes compares to reporting by other practices? Palmetto was curious, too. The Part B MAC took part in developing a Comparative Billing Report (CBR) looking at 99231-99233 billing and payment patterns in 2015 for internal medicine providers. Motivation? Those codes see about a billion dollars in improper […]

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4 Tips Take Your MOCA Coding From ‘Meh’ to Marvelous

28. April 2017

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Move over, unlisted vascular surgery code 37799! That’s what mechanochemical ablation (MOCA) codes 36473 and +36474 said when they became reportable CPT® codes on Jan. 1, 2017. Give your use of these new endovenous ablation codes a check-up with the four pointers below. 1. Read the Descriptors All the Way Through Reading the descriptor is […]

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2 Costly Hip Coding Mistakes Corrected

18. April 2017

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With all the hippity hoppity talk this time of year, I have coding for hips on the brain. Might as well go with it and look into some hip coding tips! 1. Watch for Mod 22 Opportunities With Congenital Cases If your surgeon performs hip replacement surgery for a developmental or congenital hip dislocation, there’s […]

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Welcome Spring With 3 Laceration Coding Scenarios

10. April 2017

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The weather is getting warm enough for bare feet, knees, and elbows, and that leaves them more vulnerable to lacerations. Check out these three scenarios to help you choose correct codes for those cuts, powering up your laceration coding skills for spring. Case 1: Don’t Overcode for Bandaging Skinned Knee Suppose an established patient presents […]

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